Keyword: ‘bike case study’

Probability of user fit for spatially optimized products

In Publications

Garneau, C. J. and Parkinson, M. B. (2011). Proceedings of the 2011 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. Washington, DC.

This study offers a new method for understanding the likelihood of acceptable fit for users of adjustable products and environments and is a useful tool for aiding the designer in making decisions about problems involving human variability. Continue reading…

Visual analysis of user accommodation

In Publications

Garneau, C. J. and Parkinson, M. B. (2010). Proceedings of the 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. Montreal, Quebec.

This study presents a novel, quantitative tool for design decision-making for products designed for human variability. Accommodation, which describes the ability of a user to interact with a device or environment in a preferred way, is a key product performance metric. Methods that offer a better understanding of accommodation of broad user populations would allow for the design of products that are more cost-effective, safer, and/or lead to greater levels of customer satisfaction. Continue reading…

A comparison of methodologies for designing for human variability

In Publications

Garneau, C.J. and Parkinson, M.B. (2011). Journal of Engineering Design 22(7): 505-521.

In the design of artifacts that interact with people, the spatial dimensions of the user population are often used to size and engineer the artifact. The variability in anthropometry indicates the fixed allocation of space, adjustability requirements, or how many sizes are needed to accommodate the intended user population. Various tools are used to achieve this goal, including boundary manikins, digital human models, prototypes and population models, and hybrid methods that combine the approaches. The present work explores each of these and their relative strengths and weaknesses. Continue reading…

Including Preference in Anthropometry-Driven Models for Design

In Publications

Garneau, C. J. and Parkinson, M. B. (2009). ASME Journal of Mechanical Design 131(10).

In the design of artifacts that interact with people, the spatial dimensions of the target user population are often used to determine requirements of the engineered artifact. The expected variability in body dimensions (called “anthropometry”) is used to indicate how much adjustability or how many sizes are required to accommodate the intended user population. However, the quantification of anthropometric variability alone is not sufficient to make these kinds of assessments in many situations. For example, two vehicle drivers with similar body dimensions might have different preferred locations for the seat. In these situations, preference can be broken into two components: that explained by body size and the variability that remains. By quantifying the magnitude of both sources, preference can be included in modeling strategies and design decision-making. Continue reading…

Optimal product sizing through digital human models

In Publications

Garneau, C.J. and Parkinson, M.B. (2008). Proceedings of the 2008 SAE Digital Human Modeling for Design and Engineering Conference. Pittsburgh, PA.

Designing for human variability (DfHV) requires efficient allocation of sizing and adjustability. This can preserve product performance while reducing some measures of cost. For example, specifying only as much adjustability as necessary for a desired level of accommodation leads to devices which are better suited to their users and more cost efficient. Similarly, when multiple sizes of an adjustable artifact are to be produced, specifying only as many sizes as are necessary, with an appropriate amount of adjustability per size, leads to a set of products that cost less, require fewer unique parts, facilitate maintenance standardization, and ease inventory control. Continue reading…

Including preference in anthropometry-driven models for design

In Publications

Garneau, C.J. and Parkinson, M.B. (2007). Proceedings of the 2007 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. Las Vegas, NV.

In the design of artifacts that interact with people, the spatial dimensions of the user population are often used to size and engineer the artifact. The variability in body dimensions (called “anthropometry”) is used to indicate how much adjustability or how many sizes are required to accommodate the intended user population. However, anthropometry is not the only predictor of these kinds of interactions. Continue reading…

A comparison of methodologies for designing for human variability

In Publications

Garneau, C.J. (2007). Undergraduate Honors Thesis.

In the design of artifacts that interact with people, the spatial dimensions of the user population are often used to size and engineer the artifact. The variability in size is used to indicate how much adjustability or how many sizes are required to accommodate the intended user population. However, size is not the only predictor of this kind of interaction. Continue reading…

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