Publications

There are currently 19 abstract(s) in my repository.

The Need for and Lessons from a Web-Based Tool for Design for Human Variability

D. Reuben Haupt, Christopher J. Garneau, Matthew B. Parkinson (2014). Proceedings of International Conference on Advanced Design Research and Education (ICADRE14).

Design for Human Variability (DfHV) is a DfX activity that supports the design of artifacts, tasks, and environments that are robust to the variabilty in their users. This requires an understanding of the body size and shape of the target user population. Unfortunately, data and training to properly support these activities are not adequate. Continue reading…

Considering Human Variability When Implementing Product Platforms

Garneau, C. J., Nadadur, G., and Parkinson, M. B. (2014). In Simpson, T. W., Jiao, J., Siddique, Z. and Hölttä-Otto, K. (Eds.), Advances in Product Family and Product Platform Design. New York, NY: Springer.

Design for Human Variability (DfHV) is the practice of designing artifacts, tasks, and environments that are robust to the variability in their users. Designs often incorporate adjustability and/or offer several sizes to account for the different requirements of the target user population. There are several situations where DfHV can provide platforming opportunities that might otherwise be overlooked. Continue reading…

The use of humanoid glyphs in graphs for representing human variability in the spatial design of products

glyph_scatter

Garneau, C. and Parkinson, M. (2013) Proceedings of the 2nd International Digital Human Modeling Symposium.

From simple color-coding to more intricate forms like the “Chernoff face”, glyphs are a means of visualizing multidimensional data. The spatial design of products for their users presents a unique opportunity for using glyphs as a visual metaphor for encoding data, chiefly due to the multivariate nature of many commonly encountered problems. Continue reading…

Considering just noticeable difference in assessments of physical accommodation for product design

Garneau, C. J. and Parkinson, M. B. (2013). Ergonomics 56(11): 1777-1788.

Configuring products or environments for the size of their human users requires the consideration of several characteristics of the target user population, including body dimensions (anthropometry) and preferred interaction. Users are both adaptable and imperfect observers, which often makes it difficult for them to distinguish between candidate designs. This insensitivity is described by a concept called “just noticeable difference”, or JND. This paper presents an implementation of JND modelling and demonstrates how its use in the sizing of products or environments for target user populations can improve expected performance. Continue reading…

Optimization of product dimensions for discrete sizing applied to a tool handle

accom_vs_n

Garneau, C. J. and Parkinson, M. B. (2012). International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 42(1): 56-64.

The allocation of adjustability and use of discrete sizes are two methods of accounting for the variability in the population of prospective users of a product. This paper addresses the discrete sizing problem, adapting recent adjustability research. This is done in the context of the optimization of tool handle sizes, and a case study of designing multiple sizes of a nonuniform cylindrical tool handle is presented. Continue reading…

Techniques, tools, and representations for solving design problems considering anthropometry

Q8

Garneau, C. (2012). Ph.D. dissertation.

The quality of available education, solution techniques, and tools for designers considering user body size in the development of products and environments varies widely. The objective of this work is to investigate the current state of affairs in these areas, propose new or improved methods and tools where appropriate, and evaluate these tools. Continue reading…

A comparison of methodologies for designing for human variability

Garneau2010b

Garneau, C.J. and Parkinson, M.B. (2011). Journal of Engineering Design 22(7): 505-521.

In the design of artifacts that interact with people, the spatial dimensions of the user population are often used to size and engineer the artifact. The variability in anthropometry indicates the fixed allocation of space, adjustability requirements, or how many sizes are needed to accommodate the intended user population. Various tools are used to achieve this goal, including boundary manikins, digital human models, prototypes and population models, and hybrid methods that combine the approaches. The present work explores each of these and their relative strengths and weaknesses. Continue reading…

Simultaneous consideration of user acceptability and regulatory compliance in vehicle seat design

driversBacksetSBA

Parkinson, M.B. and Garneau, C.J. (2011). International Journal of Vehicle Design 55(2): 162-173.

The success of a vehicle seat is defined in large part by its acceptability to users and compliance with applicable regulations. Simultaneously satisfying both of these objectives can be challenging, and it is the goal of the designer to balance the requirements of each to optimize the design. Continue reading…

Probability of user fit for spatially optimized products

bike_multi_std1

Garneau, C. J. and Parkinson, M. B. (2011). Proceedings of the 2011 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. Washington, DC.

This study offers a new method for understanding the likelihood of acceptable fit for users of adjustable products and environments and is a useful tool for aiding the designer in making decisions about problems involving human variability. Continue reading…

Preliminary validation of a tool for visualizing anthropometric data

problem2_dimensions_web

Garneau, C. J. and Parkinson, M. B. (2011). Proceedings of the First International Symposium on Digital Human Modeling.

Accurate representations of anthropometry are necessary for effective digital human models. It has been known for decades that inappropriate application of univariate anthropometric data to multivariate problems yields suboptimal design performance. However, traditional design tools including textbooks and univariate data tables do not foster an understanding about appropriate means for solving multivariate problems. Continue reading…

Considering Secular and Demographic Trends in Designing Long Lifetime Products for Target User Populations

deVries2010

de Vries, C., Garneau, C. J., Nadadur, N., and Parkinson, M. (2011). ASME Journal of Mechanical Design 133(8).

The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of design decisions on the accommodation afforded by long lifetime products over extended periods of time, and to then make recommendations to improve accommodation. Phenomena such as rising obesity rates, aging, and changes in user demography can affect the spatial and the physical requirements of the user population. As a result, products with long lifetimes must be robust to these secular and demographic trends. Continue reading…

Visual analysis of user accommodation

Garneau2010a

Garneau, C. J. and Parkinson, M. B. (2010). Proceedings of the 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. Montreal, Quebec.

This study presents a novel, quantitative tool for design decision-making for products designed for human variability. Accommodation, which describes the ability of a user to interact with a device or environment in a preferred way, is a key product performance metric. Methods that offer a better understanding of accommodation of broad user populations would allow for the design of products that are more cost-effective, safer, and/or lead to greater levels of customer satisfaction. Continue reading…

Considering secular and demographic trends in designing for present and future populations

deVries2010

de Vries, C., Garneau, C. J., Nadadur, G., and Parkinson, M. B. (2010). Proceedings of the 2010 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. Montreal, Quebec.

In products designed for human variability, the anthropometry (body measurements) of the target user population constitutes a primary source of variability that must be considered in the optimization of the spatial dimensions of the product. Accommodation, which describes the ability of a user to interact with a device or environment in their preferred manner, is a key measure of the performance. Other studies have considered various methods for accounting for the variability in anthropometry in a target user population to calculate estimated accommodation, but few have explicitly considered the effects of secular trends and demographic changes over time on accommodation. This paper considers these changes in the context of a case study involving truck drivers and cab geometry. Continue reading…

Optimization of tool handle shape for a target user population

Garneau2009a

Garneau, C. J. and Parkinson, M. B. (2009). Proceedings of the 2009 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. San Diego, CA.

One goal of Designing for Human Variability (DfHV) is to optimize the interaction between user and device. Often, this interaction is dictated by the spatial dimensions or shape of the artifacts with which people interact. A novel approach that applies DfHV principles including virtual fitting trials to optimize the shape of an artifact is presented and applied to the design of a tool handle. Continue reading…

Including Preference in Anthropometry-Driven Models for Design

Garneau2007

Garneau, C. J. and Parkinson, M. B. (2009). ASME Journal of Mechanical Design 131(10).

In the design of artifacts that interact with people, the spatial dimensions of the target user population are often used to determine requirements of the engineered artifact. The expected variability in body dimensions (called “anthropometry”) is used to indicate how much adjustability or how many sizes are required to accommodate the intended user population. However, the quantification of anthropometric variability alone is not sufficient to make these kinds of assessments in many situations. For example, two vehicle drivers with similar body dimensions might have different preferred locations for the seat. In these situations, preference can be broken into two components: that explained by body size and the variability that remains. By quantifying the magnitude of both sources, preference can be included in modeling strategies and design decision-making. Continue reading…

Optimal product sizing through digital human models

Garneau2008

Garneau, C.J. and Parkinson, M.B. (2008). Proceedings of the 2008 SAE Digital Human Modeling for Design and Engineering Conference. Pittsburgh, PA.

Designing for human variability (DfHV) requires efficient allocation of sizing and adjustability. This can preserve product performance while reducing some measures of cost. For example, specifying only as much adjustability as necessary for a desired level of accommodation leads to devices which are better suited to their users and more cost efficient. Similarly, when multiple sizes of an adjustable artifact are to be produced, specifying only as many sizes as are necessary, with an appropriate amount of adjustability per size, leads to a set of products that cost less, require fewer unique parts, facilitate maintenance standardization, and ease inventory control. Continue reading…

Including preference in anthropometry-driven models for design

Garneau2007

Garneau, C.J. and Parkinson, M.B. (2007). Proceedings of the 2007 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference. Las Vegas, NV.

In the design of artifacts that interact with people, the spatial dimensions of the user population are often used to size and engineer the artifact. The variability in body dimensions (called “anthropometry”) is used to indicate how much adjustability or how many sizes are required to accommodate the intended user population. However, anthropometry is not the only predictor of these kinds of interactions. Continue reading…

A comparison of methodologies for designing for human variability

Garneau2007a

Garneau, C.J. (2007). Undergraduate Honors Thesis.

In the design of artifacts that interact with people, the spatial dimensions of the user population are often used to size and engineer the artifact. The variability in size is used to indicate how much adjustability or how many sizes are required to accommodate the intended user population. However, size is not the only predictor of this kind of interaction. Continue reading…

©2015 Chris Garneau | cjgarneau@gmail.com